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ARM compiler in Linux using wine?

Hello hello!

I'm actually just curious: has anyone ever tried to compile their apps using the windows-based ARM compiler (as in, not using gcc), only rather than actually running it on a Windows machine, instead it runs on Linux using WINE?

The fact that Linux is a superior server and build environment (lotsa tools, lotsa tools) + a working WINE-based build would theoretically reduce the complexity required for a decent build system by a substantial amount. To me, it seems like a no-brainer for this to at least be something to investigate, yet there was only a single mention of WINE and the armcc compiler in this forum, and that was made something like 3 years ago and was never answered.

Has anyone tried this? Anyone had any successes?

Heh, I'm even curious if people have tried and failed.
Or tried and stopped mid-way through because of other priorities.
Or tried and the concussion wave (generated by so much concentrated awesome) obliterated you and those in the immediate area.

Any input anyone might have is appreciated, and I'll be sure to share what I can if anything worth sharing comes out of it!

zolaar wrote:Hello hello!
I'm actually just curious: has anyone ever tried to compile their apps using the windows-based ARM compiler (as in, not using gcc), only rather than actually running it on a Windows machine, instead it runs on Linux using WINE?
The fact that Linux is a superior server and build environment (lotsa tools, lotsa tools) + a working WINE-based build would theoretically reduce the complexity required for a decent build system by a substantial amount. To me, it seems like a no-brainer for this to at least be something to investigate, yet there was only a single mention of WINE and the armcc compiler in this forum, and that was made something like 3 years ago and was never answered.
They key tool missing from Linux is the BREW Simulator. Visual Studio is pretty good too, and I don't see that running on Linux any time soon!
In addition, it isn't just a matter of solving the problem for BREW. A lot of mobile developers out there will touch on Symbian and Windows CE at some point. Everything is setup for Windows, and the path of least pain is to start from there, and try to improve the development environment as much as possible. Cygwin helps a lot here. The really good tools like IDA Pro are generally cross-platform.
Once you move away from coding you'll run into other issues. Photoshop, Illustrator, Acrobat are all unavailable on Linux. Gimp is not a substitute for Photoshop, and I will never use a ghostscript-based PDF outputter again for professional printing. My printer's version of Acrobat rendered the text differently and messed up a couple of glyphs. I simply don't care whether this is an acrobat or a ghostscript bug. I do care that it's a waste of time and money! It's things like this that make it a no-brainer for me not to investigate running things on Wine! From a business perspective, it just doesn't make sense.
OS X is a better environment than Linux in this respect, and I've heard of at least two people trying to get the BREW Simulator going on OS X, but you are the first person I've heard mention Linux. I don't see why OS X with Parallels/cowhatsits shouldn't work well though. .
As for Linux being a better server. We run all our servers using Linux, and all our workstations using Windows. Horses for courses.

zolaar wrote:Hello hello!
I'm actually just curious: has anyone ever tried to compile their apps using the windows-based ARM compiler (as in, not using gcc), only rather than actually running it on a Windows machine, instead it runs on Linux using WINE?
The fact that Linux is a superior server and build environment (lotsa tools, lotsa tools) + a working WINE-based build would theoretically reduce the complexity required for a decent build system by a substantial amount. To me, it seems like a no-brainer for this to at least be something to investigate, yet there was only a single mention of WINE and the armcc compiler in this forum, and that was made something like 3 years ago and was never answered.
They key tool missing from Linux is the BREW Simulator. Visual Studio is pretty good too, and I don't see that running on Linux any time soon!
In addition, it isn't just a matter of solving the problem for BREW. A lot of mobile developers out there will touch on Symbian and Windows CE at some point. Everything is setup for Windows, and the path of least pain is to start from there, and try to improve the development environment as much as possible. Cygwin helps a lot here. The really good tools like IDA Pro are generally cross-platform.
Once you move away from coding you'll run into other issues. Photoshop, Illustrator, Acrobat are all unavailable on Linux. Gimp is not a substitute for Photoshop, and I will never use a ghostscript-based PDF outputter again for professional printing. My printer's version of Acrobat rendered the text differently and messed up a couple of glyphs. I simply don't care whether this is an acrobat or a ghostscript bug. I do care that it's a waste of time and money! It's things like this that make it a no-brainer for me not to investigate running things on Wine! From a business perspective, it just doesn't make sense.
OS X is a better environment than Linux in this respect, and I've heard of at least two people trying to get the BREW Simulator going on OS X, but you are the first person I've heard mention Linux. I don't see why OS X with Parallels/cowhatsits shouldn't work well though. .
As for Linux being a better server. We run all our servers using Linux, and all our workstations using Windows. Horses for courses.

Well, of course the sim would be welcomed by many, but (based on what has been posted in other topics) that will probably not happen in a native-linux way anytime soon. However, if one got it working in WINE I'm sure it would satisfy quite a few people's appetites.
I'm not looking for a way to make BREW development on a Linux workstation easier, though. I'm more interested in configuring a machine as a BREW application build server -- it'd run the armcc compiler and spit out the appropriate binary to either a directory or via a http link. It would tag the binary as being for a specific release of the application (date, time, appname, handset, etc). These are all things that, while absolutely possible using a windows server, are much more well-suited for Linux.
Initial bench testing is easy to do with the straight Windows tools at hand, using the emulator and a nice test handset. However, when you're testing multiple apps on multiple phones, and want a nice auto-build system that most developers and testers expect from a toolchain, you need a server. A Windows-based server is unreliable, in my opinion, so even if it was equally matched in terms of readily available and configurable utilities/tools/etc. (which, of course, is not the case by a longshot) it still is less desirable than a Linux server.
An optimum solution would be to have the armcc compiler ported to Linux -- this would make the WINE option moot. Even a non-source distro that only contained the binaries would be acceptable. However, given the track record for every other tool in the BREW kit, IP trumps IT.

Well, of course the sim would be welcomed by many, but (based on what has been posted in other topics) that will probably not happen in a native-linux way anytime soon. However, if one got it working in WINE I'm sure it would satisfy quite a few people's appetites.
I'm not looking for a way to make BREW development on a Linux workstation easier, though. I'm more interested in configuring a machine as a BREW application build server -- it'd run the armcc compiler and spit out the appropriate binary to either a directory or via a http link. It would tag the binary as being for a specific release of the application (date, time, appname, handset, etc). These are all things that, while absolutely possible using a windows server, are much more well-suited for Linux.
Initial bench testing is easy to do with the straight Windows tools at hand, using the emulator and a nice test handset. However, when you're testing multiple apps on multiple phones, and want a nice auto-build system that most developers and testers expect from a toolchain, you need a server. A Windows-based server is unreliable, in my opinion, so even if it was equally matched in terms of readily available and configurable utilities/tools/etc. (which, of course, is not the case by a longshot) it still is less desirable than a Linux server.
An optimum solution would be to have the armcc compiler ported to Linux -- this would make the WINE option moot. Even a non-source distro that only contained the binaries would be acceptable. However, given the track record for every other tool in the BREW kit, IP trumps IT.

Ah, I see. You know that RVDS (the full package) runs on Linux, right?
See
http://www.arm.com/products/DevTools/RealViewDevSuite.html
down the bottom.

Ah, I see. You know that RVDS (the full package) runs on Linux, right?
See
http://www.arm.com/products/DevTools/RealViewDevSuite.html
down the bottom.