Error: libgcc.a does not support internetworking | developer.brewmp.com Error: libgcc.a does not support internetworking | developer.brewmp.com

Developer

Error: libgcc.a does not support internetworking

Has anyone seen the message or know what it means? I'm getting this warning message when linking my program.

When I try to run the program on the phone, it displays: Unknown error (1)

--Scott Thibault

Do you mean "interworking" as opposed to "internetworking"?
Interworking refers to the ability to combine ARM 32 bit instructions with Thumb 16 bit instructions in the same module. The advantage of using Thumb instructions arises from the dramatic decrease in the size of the .mod file.
I don't know gcc but it sounds like you are telling the compiler to use interworking when the compiler does not support it.
Just a guess.

Do you mean "interworking" as opposed to "internetworking"?
Interworking refers to the ability to combine ARM 32 bit instructions with Thumb 16 bit instructions in the same module. The advantage of using Thumb instructions arises from the dramatic decrease in the size of the .mod file.
I don't know gcc but it sounds like you are telling the compiler to use interworking when the compiler does not support it.
Just a guess.

That was it. Thanks!
--Scott

That was it. Thanks!
--Scott

So has anyone used THUMB code successfully?
Quote:Originally posted by Murray Bonner
Do you mean "interworking" as opposed to "internetworking"?
Interworking refers to the ability to combine ARM 32 bit instructions with Thumb 16 bit instructions in the same module. The advantage of using Thumb instructions arises from the dramatic decrease in the size of the .mod file.
I don't know gcc but it sounds like you are telling the compiler to use interworking when the compiler does not support it.
Just a guess.

So has anyone used THUMB code successfully?
Quote:Originally posted by Murray Bonner
Do you mean "interworking" as opposed to "internetworking"?
Interworking refers to the ability to combine ARM 32 bit instructions with Thumb 16 bit instructions in the same module. The advantage of using Thumb instructions arises from the dramatic decrease in the size of the .mod file.
I don't know gcc but it sounds like you are telling the compiler to use interworking when the compiler does not support it.
Just a guess.

I use it with all of my projects. The difference in the size of the executable really is dramatic. In my productivity applications, there is no perceivable performance penalty.
I use ADS 1.2 which makes it very easy to compile Thumb code. I don't know if gcc or gnude are capable of producing Thumb builds.

I use it with all of my projects. The difference in the size of the executable really is dramatic. In my productivity applications, there is no perceivable performance penalty.
I use ADS 1.2 which makes it very easy to compile Thumb code. I don't know if gcc or gnude are capable of producing Thumb builds.

Quote:The difference in the size of the executable really is dramatic.
How big is the difference? Do you save 5%? 10%? 50%? I'm wondering if using ADS is worth the price when we already have a working gnude build...

Quote:The difference in the size of the executable really is dramatic.
How big is the difference? Do you save 5%? 10%? 50%? I'm wondering if using ADS is worth the price when we already have a working gnude build...

In my case, the .mod was about 30% smaller.

In my case, the .mod was about 30% smaller.