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In 80-D4187-1 Rev E (October 21, 2002), Test Case 3.8.2 states that you should not use the Send key for anything other than voice calls, data calls, or mobile originated SMS.

It appears that Rainbow Six and Snowball Fight use the Send key for a game function other than OTA communication.

How did those games pass TBT? Since those games passed, does that mean anyone can submit games that use the Send key for a non-TAPI function, as long as we document this thoroughly in the app spec?

--t

Personally, I would avoid it. You never know when the testers may start getting more particular about those sort of UI things...probably not worth the risk of failing a test.
In our first application, the SEND key could be used to clear the splash screen (in addition to any other key besides END and CLR). We got a negative comment for using SEND for some non-traditional use, but still passed NSTL testing. In all subsequent applications, we are making sure the SEND key does nothing, just to be safe.
Regardless, you always need to document clearly what every button press does so either way you have to put it in the button press section of the spec.
-Aaron

Personally, I would avoid it. You never know when the testers may start getting more particular about those sort of UI things...probably not worth the risk of failing a test.
In our first application, the SEND key could be used to clear the splash screen (in addition to any other key besides END and CLR). We got a negative comment for using SEND for some non-traditional use, but still passed NSTL testing. In all subsequent applications, we are making sure the SEND key does nothing, just to be safe.
Regardless, you always need to document clearly what every button press does so either way you have to put it in the button press section of the spec.
-Aaron

Thanks Aaron,
I haven't failed TBT yet, and would like to avoid ever doing so. I've been careful to conform to the TBT Guide on all earlier submissions.
I'm on a project now with a programmer who has never submitted before, and he really wants to do a couple of non-standard things such as using the Send key for a game-specific function, and also using the CLR key for something other than BACK (other games do this too).
It helps to hear other people's experiences. If nothing else, it provides ammunition to argue against violating the test guide.
--t

Thanks Aaron,
I haven't failed TBT yet, and would like to avoid ever doing so. I've been careful to conform to the TBT Guide on all earlier submissions.
I'm on a project now with a programmer who has never submitted before, and he really wants to do a couple of non-standard things such as using the Send key for a game-specific function, and also using the CLR key for something other than BACK (other games do this too).
It helps to hear other people's experiences. If nothing else, it provides ammunition to argue against violating the test guide.
--t

Since you mention the CLR button, I think its a little easier to pull this one off, as long as the CLR means something like EXIT or DELETE or BACK. After all, its already overloaded since it means 'delete' in the text entry but 'back' everywhere else.
I've also used the CLR button to mean EXIT (but not necessarily BACK) in a program I've developed that has a quiz mode. In this case, it jumps to the results screen in the quiz, not the menu that started the quiz.
This passed NSTL without any problems.
-Aaron

Since you mention the CLR button, I think its a little easier to pull this one off, as long as the CLR means something like EXIT or DELETE or BACK. After all, its already overloaded since it means 'delete' in the text entry but 'back' everywhere else.
I've also used the CLR button to mean EXIT (but not necessarily BACK) in a program I've developed that has a quiz mode. In this case, it jumps to the results screen in the quiz, not the menu that started the quiz.
This passed NSTL without any problems.
-Aaron

Well... he does want to use the CLR key in a way similar to delete, but i still don't think it matters:
Suppose we're talking about a 5-card draw poker game where you can discard 3 cards. If you press CLR, then it discards the currently selected card.
In this example, the CLR key is not being used for navigation. I don't think this passes Test Case 3.8.1.
--t

Well... he does want to use the CLR key in a way similar to delete, but i still don't think it matters:
Suppose we're talking about a 5-card draw poker game where you can discard 3 cards. If you press CLR, then it discards the currently selected card.
In this example, the CLR key is not being used for navigation. I don't think this passes Test Case 3.8.1.
--t

The documentation you submit provides a place for you to document where you app does not conform to this standard (and give an explanation as to why).
If you leave it up to the test lab to guess, then you are probably more likely to fail.
Quote:Originally posted by tom
Well... he does want to use the CLR key in a way similar to delete, but i still don't think it matters:
Suppose we're talking about a 5-card draw poker game where you can discard 3 cards. If you press CLR, then it discards the currently selected card.
In this example, the CLR key is not being used for navigation. I don't think this passes Test Case 3.8.1.
--t

The documentation you submit provides a place for you to document where you app does not conform to this standard (and give an explanation as to why).
If you leave it up to the test lab to guess, then you are probably more likely to fail.
Quote:Originally posted by tom
Well... he does want to use the CLR key in a way similar to delete, but i still don't think it matters:
Suppose we're talking about a 5-card draw poker game where you can discard 3 cards. If you press CLR, then it discards the currently selected card.
In this example, the CLR key is not being used for navigation. I don't think this passes Test Case 3.8.1.
--t

NSTL replied to my question. (Thanks Shital!!) Basically, non-standard Send key usage is forbidden. Those earlier games were grandfathered because Tier 1 apps were not subjected to 3.8.2 before. But now the Send key is tested in all apps.
Apparently, the CLR key requirement is a bit more pliable, as you guys predicted. There must be a clearly labeled exit, and just because it passes NSTL (pass-with-notes) doesn't mean the carrier will accept it as is. But everyone seems to understand how the CLR key can be pressed accidentally.
--t

NSTL replied to my question. (Thanks Shital!!) Basically, non-standard Send key usage is forbidden. Those earlier games were grandfathered because Tier 1 apps were not subjected to 3.8.2 before. But now the Send key is tested in all apps.
Apparently, the CLR key requirement is a bit more pliable, as you guys predicted. There must be a clearly labeled exit, and just because it passes NSTL (pass-with-notes) doesn't mean the carrier will accept it as is. But everyone seems to understand how the CLR key can be pressed accidentally.
--t

Quote:But everyone seems to understand how the CLR key can be pressed accidentally.
--t
Not only that, but on the Moto T720, hitting down and left simultaneously will often send a CLR key message.
This only seems to be an issue with one of my apps,
and in that app I put a confirmation message about exiting.

Quote:But everyone seems to understand how the CLR key can be pressed accidentally.
--t
Not only that, but on the Moto T720, hitting down and left simultaneously will often send a CLR key message.
This only seems to be an issue with one of my apps,
and in that app I put a confirmation message about exiting.