Resources | developer.brewmp.com Resources | developer.brewmp.com

Developer

resources

Debugging your application

The debug icon on the Plugin toolbar is enabled when Simulation or Physical is selected on the Target Type drop-down menu.

Note: Debugging from Visual Studio is not supported on BREW 3.x/4.x devices.

Debugging the application on a Brew MP simulation target

Be sure you have an existing target, otherwise you will see 'none' in the Targets drop-down menu. See the Target Manager Help and/or Simulator Help for instructions to create a simulation target.

  1. Select Brew MP Simulation Target from the target type drop-down menu, and select the desired target from the Brew MP target menu.

  2. Click the debug icon in the Visual Studio toolbar.

    The Simulator is launched with the application running on the selected target, and debug messages are displayed within the Visual Studio output window.

Debugging the application on the BREW 3.x/4.x Simulator

If you have a 3.x or 4.x platform installed, such as the BREW 3.1.5 SP01 Platform, you will see the 3.1.5 Simulator in the plugin toolbar Target Type drop-down menu.

  1. Select BREW 3.1.5 SP01 Simulator from the toolbar drop-down menu.

  2. Select the debug icon in the Visual Studio toolbar.

    The Simulator is launched with the application running, and debug messages are displayed within the Visual Studio output window.

Debugging the application on a Brew MP physical target

  1. Select Brew MP Physical Target from the target type drop-down menu, and select the desired target from the Brew MP target menu.

  2. Click the debug icon in the Visual Studio toolbar.

    The application is launched on the physical target, and Brew MP Debugger is initiated.

Debugging extensions

Typically when debugging a Brew MP application and the extension modules that it uses, the application module is specified as the primary module to be debugged. GDB treats the primary module like an executable and the additional modules that get loaded in the process as shared libraries.

A version of ARM EABI GDB that supports shared libraries is needed. As of Spring 2010, Codesourcery has shared library support. Brew MP CDB and VSGDBEngine release 7.5 are required.

If the Visual Studio solution contains projects for the application and the extension, there are no extra steps needed. Breakpoints can be set the in extension module code in the same manner they are set in the application module code.